Interview with Jeremy Rose — Fox 13 Utah, The Outspoken Offender

I have a special guest that you’ll meet here in just a few minutes. His name is Jeremy and he’s on the sex offender registry for a 2013 offense. Just last month, he was negatively portrayed on Fox 13 news in Utah for going onto school property. His daughters go to Bear River High School in Tremonton. Jeremy was blasted on the news for helping build props for an upcoming school play. Though he had a supervisor with him, either his wife or the drama teacher, there was uproar in the small, conservative community. Here to tell his side of the story, and how the negative attention has affected his children and family, is Jeremy Rose.

Transcript

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
Well, they actually go to Bear River High School.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Oh, Bear River.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
And I have one that’s in high school, one that’s in middle school, and then one that is actually in elementary out here.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Okay. So, it’s been a little while, like 30 days since that report was on. It’s probably toned down a little bit there in the community, but the lingering effects, how are you handling the mostly, I guess I would say, the negative media coverage?

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
You know, you try to take it in stride. The whole situation was frustrating because what people don’t realize is that the interview with Fox 13, it was almost two hours or even a little more than two hours. When I was done with it, both me and my wife and my kids who were there when the interview took place, all felt really good about it. And then when we actually saw it on the news, it was just frustrating. We kind of expected it might happen that it was just completely edited in a way that, as my wife put it, it kind of made me look like I was arrogant, and justifying myself, and kind of feeling entitled, and that was frustrating because during the interview it was nothing like that. It just was edited in the way that I guess news agencies tend to do it to make it a juicier story.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Yeah. Unfortunately, I worked in the business years ago before my own arrest, and I kind of feel a little bit ashamed to work for that industry now. Of course, I’ve seen the report on Fox 13 and the way they put edit it and together, and in my opinion, it wasn’t a fair assessment. I guess a lot of people that are watching today on this show may want to know what was your purpose on entering the school property? Why did you decide to go on the school property?

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
Well, I mean, it was really straightforward. It’s my daughter asked me to help get some things ready for a play that she was in, actually, that all three of my daughters were in. But my oldest that’s in school right now, she had a lead role, the lead role, in fact, and asked me to help with the props which I’ve done for years, but always away from the school because they’ve been smaller and stuff. And so, I do them at my shop and then get them to the school. But in this case, just because of the sheer scale of this… the majority that worked on were at the school itself. And this is what I told the news. I says, “It wasn’t by choice. I wasn’t excited about it. I definitely have always tried to avoid being at the school, but it’s kind of one of those things, your kid asks you to help. What do you tell them?”

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
And it wasn’t, your kid asks you to help and it’s something somebody else can do. It’s something that I actually have an expertise in. She was really nervous about a part of one of the props because it did involve her climbing basically 10 feet straight up, and she wanted me to build it, and do it in such a way that she felt comfortable doing that. And I wanted to do it in a way that she felt comfortable because I was really nervous for her. She, like me, does not enjoy heights very much. I mean, every time she climbed that thing during the play, just me and my wife would watch it, and when she made it to the top, it was just a sigh of relief. It’s like, “Oh.” And we were counting down the times that she would have to climb it.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Oh, wow. And I understand, at least according to the report is you were supervised either by your wife or the drama teacher there, Derek Sorenson. So, when you were on school property, just a couple of times, I guess, to build these props?

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
Yeah.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Okay.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
And I made a very, very straightforward effort to try to go [inaudible 00:05:34] there. Like, I’d go late at night when I got off work. I’d worked my normal job and then come home for a little bit and wait until everybody had left. And then me and my wife or my daughter would go over there and work while nobody was there, just really to avoid being around, causing exactly what happened.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Okay. So, here you are trying to help your daughters out, or your daughter out with the school props there for the school play, building this fancy tree and stuff. But why didn’t you get approval from the superintendent or the principal?

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
When I was on supervision, when I had probation, I cleared it with my PO that I was good to help out with the school as long as I follow my safety plan, which was to have one of the several people that had been approved as a supervisor for me with me. They didn’t require that I checked in with the principal. They didn’t require that I checked it with superintendent because if I go to one of my kid’s plays, I don’t check in with anybody. I just make sure I have somebody who was an approved supervisor for me. This was when I was on paper on probation. And so, I just followed that same rule. I made sure that somebody there, and in this case, in most cases, it was somebody that was one of my approved when I was on probation because people keep getting it mixed up thinking, “Well, how come you weren’t following… Where’s your safety plan?” I’m not on probation.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
The only difference is I follow this safety plan to protect me from basically any kind of accusation or anything like that. And so, I’d have my wife, or I would have Derek who’s aware of my past. But the funny thing is, and my wife brought up is a lot of the drama parents that were there, because parents volunteered, there were always parents there while we were doing it, and a lot of those parents are also aware of my past and they aren’t even people I had as supervisor, they just were there and can testify that I was never alone with anybody. But yeah, that’s how it was when I was on probation. And so, when I got released from probation early, we just maintain that and it has never been an issue. It just came down to the right person who had kind of a score to settle, I guess you might say, with the school on some situations that happened there, making a stink about it and creating this public outcry.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Yeah, it’s interesting. Something that just came to my mind is I lived in Utah during my supervision, federal supervision. I lived in Bountiful, and at the time, I had a stepdaughter and I would go to her… She has a learning disability and somewhat, so an IEP meeting it’s called, a student-teacher conference, things like that. I went on the school property and I didn’t clear it with… I cleared it with my probation officer, but I didn’t clear it with anyone personally at the school. Like, I didn’t go to the principal and go in there, and say, “Hi, I’m Matt,” and all that. So, it’s that parental responsibility that they’re talking about. Do you think your presence there at the school helping with this play and the props qualifies as… Not parental supervision, but just helping your daughter out-

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
Responsibility.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Yeah, responsibility.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
Well, I mean, and I never really thought about it until all this outcry and stuff in this way. For me, it was my kids asked for my help, and I think it’s an easy way to sort if something’s a parental responsibility. If you’re a parent and your child asks you for help, are you the kind of parent that says, “It’s my responsibility to help”, or do you feel comfortable saying, “No, that’s not my responsibility”? And so, yeah, if my kids ask me for help, to me, that’s my responsibility. But in this situation, had it not been for certain circumstances with the props and actually my kid’s safety with those, I probably would have argued it and said, “Let’s figure out another way of doing it.” But in this particular circumstance, I mean, I was really in a situation where I felt like I needed to go in and do the work there because there just was not a way for me to do it away from there.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
What’s frustrating for me is if someone is watching or was watching that news report, Fox 13 Utah, and they weren’t educated about the registry and the people that are forced to register, they may look at you as a threat to children or a threat to the people in the school. What would you like to say to these people that are uneducated and that look at you as a dangerous person that should never be allowed on school property?

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
You know, and I don’t know if you’re going to bring it up in this conversation or later, but I was in law enforcement for a lot of years, and I really was a supporter of the registry and harder punishment, and things like that. I can look back on it, not even necessarily looking back on it, but when I was in law enforcement, there’s very much a mentality of as long as people feel safe, whether they’re safe or not, as long as they feel safe, your job’s okay. You’re okay. And I look at the registry, and I think people that are uneducated with the history of it and how it’s really become as bloated as it has now, it really is a false sense of security. People think, “Oh, okay, well, because this guy’s on the registry, then I know if I keep my kids away from him, everything’s safe and everything’s wonderful.” And they tend to forget that, what is it, I think 4% of offenses are committed by people on the registry. You know?

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Yeah, yeah. I was going to bring this up and something that you said in the interview or a phone call with the reporter. I don’t have his name right off the bat, and this is a quote from you from the phone call with a reporter at Fox 13. “If someone’s going to be perpetrated on, it’s probably not going to be someone on the Sex Offender Registry.” And you were very close when you said 4%. It’s actually 5%. But almost 95% of sex crimes are committed by someone who would not be on the registry. We don’t want any percent, I understand. But 95% of sex crimes are committed first time that is not on the registry. So, it is a false sense of security. How do we educate people about this? They’re just stuck in the fact that everybody on the registry is a danger. What are your ideas? Because I’m doing my best, but I don’t know. I get frustrated sometimes.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
It’s going to take, really, people accepting the truth of how things are. I think a good example of that is in my narcotic days when I was a narcotics agent, we started serving warrants for methamphetamine locally, and when we served the first two or three, man, you had everybody on board. The mayor, they wanted the media involved, and it was this really great thing, and everybody loved it. And then when we got up to about five or six, it was like, “Well, you know what? Let’s not call the media this time because this is starting to look bad.” And then as you get up to like 10 and 15, it’s like, the mayor, you just started getting, “You know what? Just do what you need doing. Don’t let me know about it. It’s better if I don’t know.”

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
And it’s really, people like to just put the blinders on and say, “Okay the registry’s in places so now everybody’s safe. I know where all the offenders are. And so, I can send my kids to this part of town because they’re safe because all offenders are on this side.” Well, what they’re doing is instead of taking the responsibility as parents to educate, they’re just taking this, oh, well, the government obviously knows what’s best for me and know what they’re doing. So, they say all the bad people are here. Let’s send people over here. Well, those are the people that aren’t being watched so, those are the people that haven’t been through a situation and are trying to better themselves, and have been held accountable for the things they’ve done. You have the people that are yet to be on the registry, or if they ever will be.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
And so, it really comes down to people need to accept that, look, the registry doesn’t determine whether a person’s going to commit a crime, or [inaudible 00:15:04] just is a label that’s been put on somebody to help them have a warm, fuzzy feeling at night, and it really is accomplishing nothing, and if anything, it gives them this feeling of okay, if I keep them away from them, then they’re safe, instead of saying, “Okay, maybe I need to educate.” Like most are inner familial offenses or there’s a good portion. Yeah, I think that’s the right term.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Yeah.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
But people don’t want to accept that. It’s easier to say, “Well, all the people on the registry, those are the bad guys.” And so, they don’t educate, and that’s kind of the sad reality of it.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
It’s weird to think that the people that we should be more concerned about are the people that are not on the registry, but we don’t know. It’s hard to explain. Their information isn’t posted online or on the registry. So, we’re like, “Well, we’re not worried about those people. We know what this person has done, so we’d better keep an eye on them.” And we can go into the recidivism rates and all that. They’re very low. But what I do want to ask you now is in a support email you had written Women Against Registry, great organization, you stated, and here’s another quote, but I love quotes. You lay down long enough in the email. What did you mean by that? I mean, are you still angry right now about this news report?

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
Yeah. You know, it wasn’t really an angry thing. What that really stems from is when I went through counseling, and I did a longer stint in counseling than most. You have to understand the circumstance. I only committed the one offense, but no, there’s more to it. But anyways, when I say there’s more to it, I got charged both state and federal for the same offense, and that turned into a big hoopla thing. But when I was in counseling, you got to know a lot of the people you’re in counseling with. And I saw a lot of people come in and come and go through counseling. And really, they were really for the most part, and really, the vast majority, for the most part, they were really good guys. I mean, they were really good guys with a lot to offer this world, and really accountable for the things they’d done and really wanting to better themselves. And it is tough to sit in a room with even people that you yourself had put in prison and hear their stories and-

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Because you were a police officer, yeah.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
Yeah, yes. It’s an eyeopener for one. And I decided back then that I feel like I need to do something because I was so much of a part of the society that pushed the registry, unforgiving punishment, and stuff. And when you see the other side of it, the flip side of it, it’s like, man, I wish I had known then the things I know now when I was in more of a position I could have made change, and I would have stood up to the peer pressure because heaven forbid, as law enforcement, you’d show any kind of empathy to somebody who had committed an offense. Man, you were thrown to the wolves.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Which side do you fall now since you were a police officer and now, unfortunately, you’re on the registry? Do you know what I’m saying? Some of those roots of being a police officer is still within you today?

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
Yeah. You know, they’ll always be there because I still have ties there. I have family that’s still involved in law enforcement and they were my family. They’re either guys I worked with, or my family for a really a large portion of my life, so there will always be that. It’s funny because I’ll drive by and see an officer has somebody pulled over, and I get kind of an anxiety of is that guy safe, is something going to happen because you have that. And it’s weird that I still I feel that, but from really, the day that I committed my offense to today as I’m talking to you, really, maybe two guys that I knew have spoken to me. I mean, it’s like you lose because you consider them your family and it’s like you lost your family overnight.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
But on the flip side of that, I also did realize that a lot of these guys that were in counseling and stuff are… I mean, I got to be… It’s hard to use the term friends because you’re not allowed to be friends with them if that makes sense, just because the rules and stuff say you can’t associate with people that are convicted felons, and stuff like that. But at the same time, you really get to know these guys and you see they really are some amazing people. And I mean, they’re, in many cases, guys that just were better people than a lot of the guys I work with professionally.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
I want to talk for a moment about how your… I asked you earlier, but I want to get a little more in-depth with it, on how your daughter handled this. There has been reports that children with parents on the registry get bullied at school if other kids find out, if their friends find out. How has it affected your daughter, the one that you were helping build the prop for the play? And I understand she was in the play. Right?

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
Yeah. Well, actually, all three of my daughters, my seven-year-old, my 14-year-old, and she was 16 at the time, my 17-year-old. Let’s just say that, so all three of my daughters.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
I can’t keep track of your kids. How many kids do you…

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
Yeah. Well, and I’ve got an older daughter that’s married and doing whatever.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Okay.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
But yeah, they were all in the play. And as far as how it affected them, I don’t like living in the past. [inaudible 00:21:22] committed the offense and we went through all that, it was very, very difficult on them, not really so much dealing with the school stuff. Save a few people, we are in a really great community, and especially the area that we live in here in town. Just very supportive, very good people.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
And so, it was difficult kind of going through the initial stuff but you kind of you get used to it, then you’re on the registry and stuff, and you have to kind of get used to a few rules there and things. But this last time, it more was because well, my counselor, you live your life in a way that when people find out you’re on the registry, it’s a surprise to them. They’ll say, “I never would’ve thought that about a person.” And I really have taken that to heart, and I have made it a point to live my life that way.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
And so, they had a few friends, not a lot, they had a few new friends that had no idea that I was on the registry and stuff. But when they found out, them and their families were very supportive for the most part.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
That’s good.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
And there were a few that were like, “Okay, now that we know you’re on the registry, what do we need to know about it?” or, “Is it an issue?” And they would question, “Well, should he be there?” And it was difficult for my wife had to constantly explain, “Look, if it’s for parental responsibility, he can be there.” And people just kind of twist things around and stuff, but ultimately, this time, they were able to kind of handle [inaudible 00:23:00]. And we always told them when this all first started happening, we says, “Look guys, if you’ve got friends that don’t want to be friends with you anymore because of this, those aren’t the kinds of friends you want, anyways.”

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Definitely.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
And sadly, it’s been eight, nine years. And so, it’s a part of their lifestyle now. So, it’s not really out of the ordinary-

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Sure. Now, Jeremy-

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
… but it’s always difficult.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Sorry to interrupt you. But Jeremy, you just said that you don’t like to live in the past. And so, you said that your original crime, eight to nine years ago, and now you’re being brought up again on local news related to your initial arrest, your sex offense. Do you feel like this is an additional punishment for you and your family?

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
I mean, absolutely. How could it not be a punishment? The registry, it is just a lifelong punishment is what it is.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
What would you like to tell Fox 13 and other news outlets? And there’s a lot of them. I mean, I go on the news. I go on Google and I search, and there’s very, I mean, really never any good news stories about someone on the registry. It’s always this person got arrested, blah, blah, blah, blah. What would you like to tell news outlets on how they report on people forced to register or people that have been arrested for a sexually based offense?

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
It’s frustrating, just that question’s frustrating because no matter what the reporters tell you that they care about you and they want your side of the story, they’re going to try to make a story, and they know what sells, and fear sells. It is a sad reality. And so, as far as what I’d like to tell them is am I wasting my time by saying anything because they’re going to… And I saw it on the law enforcement side too. I mean, I remember using the media as a tool for cases and things like that. So, we used to refer to them when in my cop days, like the Standard Examiner, we called them the Standard Exaggerator and just very [inaudible 00:25:27] anything that they reported was ever accurate. It was more about sensationalizing something.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
There something I told the news and they didn’t bother putting any of it in there is this drama teacher and this program have been almost a lifesaver for my kids. It’s turned them around because they were very introverted because of my… At least it played a role, my initial offense, and them having to deal with all that, they’re introverted. And this program has just been a godsend to me and my wife. I mean, you look at our kids now, and they’re just outgoing and succeeding, and a lot of it is because of this drama and that’s why me and my wife have dedicated ourselves to helping this program. Not because I want to be in school around children, but because it’s so important to my children.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Sure, you’re trying to be a… Yeah.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
We want to be a part of this, yeah.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Yeah, you’re trying to be a supportive father, I mean.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
Yeah, and in doing that, I was also helping the drama department. And I mean, just the stuff that I donated and the time that I donate is worth thousands and thousands of dollars. And now, I just really am not in a position to be able to do that anymore. It’s like really all she accomplished was cutting me off from being able to help out.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
So, you’re done. I mean, that’s it. No more volunteering at the school at this point.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
At the school. But as far as being done, absolutely not, and I’ll tell you why, and again, I told this to the guys at Fox 13. I says, “I was talking to a coworker as this was all going on.” It was actually a supervisor, kind of explained how it’s affecting our family and just how terrible it was going through this and stuff and telling them to expect to see this on the news, and that’s never a fun conversation to have. But he says, “You know what, Jeremy? You know what I would do if I were you? I would tell these people…” and I’m quoting him here. This is the lady that was complaining and the people school district. He says, “I would take those people on and tell them, ‘All right, fine. If you want to be like this, then I am never going to help another single person for as long as I live.’”

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
And I kind of looked at him and I made a decision right then that I was never going to be like that. I don’t care who screams and how loud they scream. If I can help, I’m going to help because as part of my parental responsibility, I need to be an example to my kids. And to be that example, you know what? I’m going to help. I’m not going to give up on people. And so, yeah, absolutely. In fact, I’m making things right now for the drama teacher.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Well, that’s awesome.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
I’m just going to make them at my shop and giving to my daughter to take there because I’m not going to let this lady or people like her win.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Sure. Okay. So, you’ve handled this, in my opinion, from what I’m seeing, very, very well, your initial arrest, and then in being all over the news again for you entering school property. What advice would you have for people and families that are affected by the registry on how to keep going forward and remaining positive? What advice would you give those people that are watching and listening today?

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
Really, I think the most important thing, and it goes back to what my counselor said, is for those of you that are on the registry, live your life in a way that when people find out they’re surprised, and you really need to do that. And it’s not just for you. It’s for all of us. We got to remember, we’re kind of in this together. I get frustrated every time I look and see a news article that says, “Person on the registry arrested for an offense.” It’s like, “Guys, come on, we’re in this together.” I can never stress enough how important family support is for people on the registry. I will tell you, I will bet you a lot of money that when you see the news stories of people who are on the registry and committed an offense again, I will bet the vast majority of them do not have a support structure in place. They’re the people that I just feel bad for. I wish I could go and give them all the advantages that I’ve had by having such huge support.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
Really, the vast majority of people who have committed offenses that have a strong support system in place, they’re very unlikely to commit another offense. And I feel bad for the people because I really think that they are lacking that. But I say kudos to family that standby people on the registry. It’s not an easy thing to do. My hat goes off to you guys, yeah.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
I know what you’re saying. I mean, I would not be sitting here interviewing you if it wasn’t for my family and the support they have given me, and the very, very few friends that I still have. It’s huge. It’s huge. And I’m glad to hear that you do have support. Your wife is sticking by you. Your kids are sticking by you. I can kind of hear them in the background. So, it’s great that you have this. It’s okay. It’s okay if we can hear them. I just want to say I can hear them and that’s great. You have this big supportive family and that’s awesome to hear.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
So, another question that I wanted to ask is I know how I felt after I was blasted all over the news. I was very kind of paranoid. I wanted to get out of Utah immediately. I was scared to even look at anybody. How do you feel even with your kids or your wife, going to the store, knowing that just recently, your face was all over the news again? Do you get really like nervous or uncomfortable or is it just you don’t think about it?

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
This is going to sound ridiculous, but thank goodness for corona. You throw a mask on. You go in. You do what you need to do, man.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Oh, yeah, that’s true.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
I know, it’s kind of an unfair advantage from in the past where I had to go through this.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Interesting.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
But yeah, coronavirus mask. It’s like, “Whatever.” Throw my mask on. Go do what I need to do. I think sometimes you can catastrophize it. And really, it really doesn’t stick in people’s minds that long. That’s what’s frustrating. It sticks in a very few people’s minds for a very long time, like this lady that complained, but the vast majority of people, it really doesn’t [inaudible 00:32:09].

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Yeah, that’s true though [crosstalk 00:32:14] because it’s going to stick in your mind, and it’s going to stick in my mind because it has affected our lives big time, but the people that watch the news, yeah. The next story, what’s the next story? Okay. And that’s just something that I have to work on.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
I mean, you do get nervous about it because you think, “Okay, who was it complaining?” and whatever. But in a way, something like this and what we went through, it kind of is nice to be able to look at… Like, my wife looks at the comments and things like that, and it gives you a pretty clear view of okay, who do I need to avoid, and who am I okay to be around. And the great thing is, is that the vast majority of people in our area and stuff, we’re good to be around them. They’re just really, really supportive. And that is kind of something that I never would have imagined what happened, that somebody like me with the past like mine, when all this happened, all of a sudden, just crazy amounts of support.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Well, I mean, if there’s anything else that you want to comment on or like to say to people watching, I’d like to give you that opportunity, something that I haven’t covered. And we can be talking for hours here, but I know you’ve got parental responsibilities and you’ve got a family to get to. So, anything else you want to say?

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
What I would like to say to people like you and to Vicki and all, I hope you keep fighting this good fight because-

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Well, it’s not just me or Vicki from Women Against Registry or the other organizations. It is you too coming on and talking about your story, and I’m happy that there are more people speaking up that have been affected by the registry, family members, the children, and teens on the registry. We are starting to speak up and that’s good. 10 years ago, I don’t think we would be having this conversation, 10 or 15 years ago.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
Yeah, but 10 years ago, the registry wasn’t the nightmare that it is now.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Well, that’s true. It’s getting worse every year. So, but yes. You are giving people hope.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
Well, it’s just like my experience was just the people that should have made good decisions just did what they needed to placate the people screaming, and it didn’t help anybody. It really didn’t fix anything. It fixed nothing. It helped nothing, but it has a potential to destroy everything. And it’s like what a waste of time.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Jeremy, thanks so much for being on the show. I really appreciate you coming on and telling your story. When we see those news stories on Fox 13 Utah, wherever it may be, KUTV there in Salt Lake as well, we don’t see the full story. They don’t have the time to show the full story. I have time and we can get your comments, and how it affects you and your family, and I really do appreciate it. You’re giving hope to people on the registry today by being on the show.

Jeremy Rose (Guest):
No, hopefully, I can do something to help. Like I said, anything I can do to help, I’m ready to do. I’m done sitting quiet.

The Outspoken Offender (Host):
Education is the best weapon against child abuse, not the registry. The United States has one of the worst records among industrialized nations, losing on average between four and seven children every day to child abuse and neglect. The best way to reduce the damage of child abuse and neglect is to prevent child abuse and neglect, and educating children, their parents, teachers, school professionals, and the community is key to the prevention. Thanks for watching this episode of The Outspoken Offender. Join me next time.

Helping registered citizens and former inmates move beyond stereotypes and social ostracism.

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